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1 Living with the oceans. – A report on the state of the world's oceans

Methane hydrates

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A future energy source?

Although the immense methane hydrate occurrences represent a risk to the climate, they are also a potential energy source. The amount of natural gas bound up in the hydrates far exceeds the natural gas reserves in conventional deposits. Natural gas fed into the supply lines from conventional sources already consists of more than 95 per cent methane. Until now, mining hydrates in the ocean has been considered an expensive process. As resource prices rise, however, these reserves are becoming more attractive to the offshore industry. Many scientists estimate that mining the hydrates could be economically feasible at an oil price of about 50 to 60 US dollars per barrel. This implies that production would already be profitable today. Great efforts are presently being made to develop hydrate deposits, particularly in the territorial waters of Japan, China, India, South Korea and Taiwan.

7.8 > Methane hydrates occur worldwide. This ice-like block with a honeycomb structure was obtained from the sea floor during a research expedition off the coast of Oregon.

7.9 > In methane hydrates, the methane gas molecules are tightly enclosed in cages composed of water molecules. Increasing temperatures render the cages unstable, the gas escapes.

7.8 > Methane hydrates occur worldwide. This ice-like block with a honeycomb structure was obtained from the sea floor during a research expedition off the coast of Oregon.
© http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datei:Gashydrat_mit_Struktur.jpg [Stand: 5.10.2010] 
7.9 > In methane hydrates, the methane gas molecules are tightly enclosed in cages composed of water molecules. Increasing temperatures render the cages unstable, the gas escapes. © maribus (after IFM-GEOMAR)

Carbon dioxide storage in the ocean

At the same time, new technologies are being developed in Germany that may be useful for exploring and extracting the hydrates. The basic idea is very simple: the methane (CH4) is harvested from the hydrates by replacing it with CO2. Laboratory studies show that this is possible in theory because liquid carbon dioxide reacts spontaneously with methane hydrate. If this concept could become economically viable, it would be a win-win situation, because the gas exchange in the hydrates would be attractive both from a financial and a climate perspective.
Natural gas is a relatively clean fossil fuel. CO2 emissions from gas-fired power plants are about 50 per cent lower than from conventional coal-fired plants. But even the emissions from modern gas-fired systems can be reduced considerably when CCS technology (carbon capture and storage) is installed. By this method the CO2 is isolated directly at the power plant and is stored in underground geological formations. Another option would be to inject the CO2 into the marine methane hydrates; by this method, not only would methane gas be obtained, but the carbon dioxide would also be securely captured. Onshore, CO2 is stored as a supercritical fluid that is mobile and chemically very aggressive. Some experts are concerned that underground storage reservoirs could therefore start to leak after a time. If, instead, carbon dioxide is stored as a hydrate within the cold deep sea floor, it would be much safer, because CO2 hydrates are considerably more thermally stable than methane hydrates. Even warming of the sea floor would not destabilize them. But this approach also involves ecological risk. During hydrate excavation the methane could escape unchecked into the seawater. .
To eliminate this risk, only the very deep hydrate occurrences that are covered by fine-grained sediment layers at least 100 metres thick should be developed. This is the only way to enable the methane gas to be retrieved safely through a borehole without the possibility of its escaping into the environment. In addition, care must be taken to ensure that the formation pressure is not increased by more than 10 bar during retrieval of the gas, as the sediment layers could otherwise break open and allow large amounts of methane to escape.

7.10 > The amount of carbon stored in methane hydrates at the sea floor (C in gigatonnes) far exceeds that stored in oil, gas and coal.

7.11 > A group of marine scientists on the deck of a research vessel ignite methane gas released from a degrading hydrate block.

7.10 > The amount of carbon stored in methane hydrates at the sea floor (C in gigatonnes) far exceeds that stored in oil, gas and coal. 
© maribus (after Energy Outlook 2007; Buffett & Archer, 2004) 
7.11 > A group of marine scientists on the deck of a research vessel ignite methane gas released from a degrading hydrate block. © Marc Steinmetz/Visum

Is there a future for methane mining?

So far the necessary mining technology has only been tested under laboratory conditions. Many years of development work are still needed to be able to reliably evaluate the potentials and risks and to realize mining on an industrial scale. The extraction of natural gas from methane hydrates onshore was successfully tested for the first time in 2008 by Japanese and Canadian scientists. In northern regions, methane hydrates lie hundreds of metres beneath the permafrost sediments. It is cold enough and the pressure is sufficient for hydrates to form there too. In contrast to the deposits in the sea floor, however, these hydrate occurrences are easy to access and therefore suitable for production tests. The tests showed that it is possible to produce natural gas by breaking down methane hydrates through the introduction of heat or the release of pressure.
The retrieval of methane by replacement with carbon dioxide will now be tested onshore. A Norwegian-American consortium is set to carry out a production test in Alaska. The first offshore attempts are then planned for 2012 to 2014 on the continental slope off Japan. How and when methane hydrates are finally mined in the future depends on the results of these field investigations. And of course the development of world market prices for natural gas and carbon dioxide emission rights are also pivotal to any decisions to begin offshore mining on a major scale. Textende
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