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1 Living with the oceans. – A report on the state of the world's oceans

Organic pollutants

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Occurrence of polyfluorinated compounds

Polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been industrially manufactured for around half a century, but it has only recently been possible to detect their presence in the environment due to new chemical and analytical techniques. Natural origins of these chemicals are not known to exist, and yet today PFCs can be detected in water, soil, air and living organisms worldwide – including humans. High levels of PFCs have been found in nu­me­rous foods as well as in human blood and breast milk. The distribution of PFOS in the environment is particularly well-researched. High concentrations of these substances have been detected in fish, seals and sea birds worldwide and, above all, in Arctic polar bears, which are at the top of the food chain. Researchers from Canada and Denmark have reported a sharp rise in PFOS concentrations in liver samples taken from polar bears in Canada, Alaska and Greenland in recent decades. Compared to other environmentally relevant POPs, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, PFCs are found in much higher concentrations. In Swedish studies of human blood from 1994 to 2000, the mean PFC concentration was 20 to 50 times higher than the concentration of the polychlorinated biphenyls and about 300 to 450 times higher than that of hexachlorobenzene, two “classic” organic pollutants that have been recognised as hazardous for decades.
4.8 > PFOS concentrations in the livers of East Greenland polar bears have increased significantly in recent years. The measurements were obtained from deep-frozen liver samples.
4.8 > PFOS concentrations in the livers of East Greenland polar bears have increased significantly in recent years. The measurements were obtained from deep-frozen liver samples. © maribus (after Dietz et al., 2008)

Transport of PFCs

The detection of PFCs and especially PFOS in marine mammals such as Arctic seals and polar bears, and even in the blood of the Arctic’s human inhabitants, the Inuit, raises the question of transportation: How did these substances end up in the sea and even in the Arctic? There are numerous different sources of PFCs. They are released, for example, during the use of the everyday consumer durables mentioned above – from carpeting, outdoor clothing, cookware and fast-food packaging. However, in Germany, relatively large concentrations of PFCs also enter the rivers from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants, which cannot capture these substances. The rivers then wash these substances into the North Sea. From here, they are carried by the main North Sea and Atlantic Ocean currents to the Arctic, where they are ingested by microorganisms in the water and thus enter the food chain, bioaccumulating in larger organisms and finally in the organs of polar bears and humans. PFCs are also transported long distances through the atmosphere by the movement of air masses. Compounds such as PFOS are not volatile, but volatile precursor compounds escape into the atmosphere during the manufacturing process. Physical and chemical processes that take place in the atmosphere then convert these chemical precursors into stable end products such as PFOS. These are removed from the air by precipitation and enter the seawater in soluble form or bound to dust particles, or are deposited on land or ice surfaces. PFCs can thus travel great distances and can be detected in the environment a long way from their place of origin or use.
4.9 > PFCs can travel great distances in water or air. Through a direct pathway, they enter the rivers in wastewater and are carried down to the sea. They can also be transported indirectly through the atmosphere. For example, volatile PFOS precursors are released into the atmosphere, where they are converted into PFOS, which is then deposited back on the Earth’s surface at the place of origin or elsewhere in rainfall or in dust particles.
4.9 > PFCs can travel great distances in water or air. Through a direct pathway, they enter the rivers in wastewater and are carried down to the sea. They can also be transported indirectly through the atmosphere. For example, volatile PFOS precursors are released into the atmosphere, where they are converted into PFOS, which is then deposited back on the Earth’s surface at the place of origin or elsewhere in rainfall or in dust particles. © maribus

Protection from new pollutants

Today PFCs are distributed all over the world. They are found in water, in the air, in living organisms and even in our own bodies. They are likely to persist for generations. This group of substances clearly shows that it is impossible to predict all the environmental impacts, or the delayed effects, of new chemical substances. In the future too, it is likely that some substances that were initially regarded as harmless, but whose undesirable effects can only be discerned after some time has elapsed, will be detected in the marine environment. Nowadays, however, intensive efforts are being made to limit the further global spread of pollutants. For example, risk assessments are carried out before chemicals are licensed for use, in order to determine to what extent they could constitute a hazard. There are also various voluntary renunciation schemes for producers, as well as relevant legislation. In other words, a start has been made. Textende
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